Passing On Things That Matter (Part Three of Four)

Cup_of_Coffee.GIFSuppose you were asked to pass on some of the most valuable lessons that you have learned as a Christ-follower.  What would you want to pass on?  (See part 1 and part 2).  

 
The following are a few truths that I would want to pass on regarding life as a Christ-follower:
 

  • Seek out a community of believers who are serious about following Christ.
  • Read the Bible daily.  Make it your aim to read the whole Bible.  Far too many believers get only a very limited view of the story of God because they never get beyond a few favorite passages. 
  • Observe several people who have been Christians for awhile and who seem to be growing and maturing in their faith.  Ask them what they have found to be helpful. 
  • Know that some Christians will disappoint you.  Make sure that your faith is in Jesus and not human beings.

This is only a start.  What would you add to this list? 

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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13 thoughts on “Passing On Things That Matter (Part Three of Four)

  1. Jim,
    A 28-year-old young woman at our church passed away suddenly and unexpectedly this week.  This is from her MySpace page and I think if I could learn this I would be a more joyful Christian and more effective in my walk:
    "Some day everything will make perfect sense.  So, for now, laugh at the confusion, smile through the tears, and keep reminding yourself that everything happens for a reason."  (Kristin Starkey Wilson)
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

  2. Jim,
    I won’t add add to your list.  I just wanted to say that I like your emphasis on the Word and prayer.  It reminded me of a song I was taught as a kid: "Read your Bible and pray everyday, and you’ll grow, grow, grow."  It seems like these days a lot of conservative protestants want to learn about and adopt traditions that they, and many of their teachers, hardly understand (lent, lectio divina, practices of the desert fathers, etc.). 
    This irritates me (can you tell?) especially when the known-but-neglected traditions are consistent with "mere Christianity" and would well serve the groups to whom they belong.

  3. One of the more impacting insights I’ve ever had to Scripture that literally changed my walk with the Lord is that I can relax in what Christ has done on my behalf. I don’t have to strive to do enough or be good enough … I am saved by grace and safe in the finished work of Jesus. The other side of this is that now I will actually do more for the kingdom out of gratitude and love than from a perspective of trying to earn anything.

  4. I am a recent subscriber to your blog. I have been enjoying the 4 part series. One thing that I would want to pass on is to make it your aim to really enjoy God. I think so many times I’ve been religious and have forgotten about the relationship. The joy of the Lord is our strength; to enjoy God completely through study, through  relationships, private and public worship, through observing nature, or through a friend. 

  5. Make every act a prayer…often when I am working with my hands at work, I am having a wonderful private conversation with my Heavenly Father….as I form dough for cinnamon rolls, I might ask that they nourish more than just the senses and the body…that God would transmit His love through my work…I know it sounds kind of "out there" and "spiritual", but it puts my work into a perspective of doing something for and with my Lord…He, guiding and directing and working with me, and I forming what He has shown me…I don’t know, I guess it sounds corny now that I put it onto "paper".  Hope someone benefits!
    Iain

  6. Jim, I like this list. I’d add to the last point that in some ways, especially for the younger Christian, everyone will disappoint them at times, even if some disappointment is misplaced. Well, even Jesus disappointed his disciples and family, though that was certainly all misplaced. And of course each of us humans sometimes do fail, along the way.

  7. Frank,Very good point.  While I may learn and grow from exposure to a variety of spiritual disciplines, that doesn’t have to negate disciplines which may be quite familiar but nevertheless useful.Would love to hear you say more on this sometime.  Thanks. 

  8. Greg,Thanks.  I like the way you express this regarding the finished work of Christ.  In his finished work, I am able to relax and work hard.Hope you are doing well. 

  9. Hi Jon,Welcome!  I am glad you are here and that you left this comment.  Very good point about learning to enjoy God.  Well said!

  10. Iain,I like what you said.  It doesn’t sound corny to me.  Rather, it sounds like you are very conscious of the presence of God even during the mundane and ordinary moments of the day.Thanks. 

  11. Jim, What a brilliant set of points, I also like the last one, its a hard lesson to learn that even mature christians you respect are no infallable and as such will fail us if our expectations grow, and though Christ may not respond as we always like either he is always faithful to bring us through.
    Another thing I would say is that pursuing continuity in your life, and authenticity in your life, as we can often lead very sectioned lives eg. workplace, college, friends, family, its such an important lesson to remember to bring Christ into everything.