Gratitude

This morning as I drove to work, I thought about some of the blessings I have and how thankful to God I am for various people and places.

  1.  I am thankful for Charlotte (my wife), for Christine and her two boys, Brody and Lincoln.  I am thankful for Jamie and Cal and their little boy Sully.  To have three grandchildren is such a blessing!
  2. I am thankful for the years of preaching to congregations in Florence, Ala.; Kansas City, Mo.; and Waco, Tx.  To this day, there are people in these places who are some of our dearest friends.
  3. I am thankful for the privilege of serving at Harding School of Theology (Memphis).  This school has served students well for decades.  (Have you ever considered taking a course at a school like this?  You can do this in the privacy of your home or office through HST Live.  Contact Matt Carter – mrcarter@hst.edu)  I am also grateful for the wonderful people whom I have met and worked with at Harding University.
  4. I am thankful for the opportunity to grow.  I read books and articles.  I listen to audio books.  I regularly listen to podcasts and recordings of sermons and talks.  More than ever, I have a great hunger to grow.
  5. I am thankful for churches who invited me to speak and teach.  I have been with some wonderful groups of people this past year.  I am honored to be invited.  In particular, I am grateful for the Millington Church of Christ where I have been preaching once a month for over two years.
  6. I am thankful for the ministers who I talk with across the country.  I regularly talk with ministers over coffee, on the phone, or by way of Zoom.  These conversations often bless me more than them.  I am thankful to know such g00d people.
  7. I am thankful for unexpected moments of encouragement.  The unexpected phone call or note.  The unexpected conversation.  These moments are often great times of joy and satisfaction.
  8. I am thankful for good, sweet people who spend their lives doing good.  These are people who often need little maintenance themselves and who bless others through giving their time and resources.  At the moment, I have in mind some of the donors who invest in the students at Harding School of Theology.
  9. I am thankful for God’s help in navigating through life’s messiness.  Sometimes, life is just hard.  People can disappoint and even hurt.  Nevertheless, God is faithful.
  10. I am thankful, most of all, for God’s goodness, love, and holiness.  When I ponder these aspects of God, I quickly realize that he is much larger than my problems or my concerns.
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gratitude-1

 

Today, I am grateful.

I am grateful for my wife Charlotte, my daughter Christine, my daughter Jamie and our son-in-law, Cal.  Charlotte is one of the hardest working school teachers I know.  I am so proud of Christine, Jamie, and Cal.  They communicate to me regularly just how important I am to them.

I am grateful for three wonderful grandsons.  Brody.  Lincoln.  Sully.  These are three little boys who make me smile and laugh regardless of what might have gone on that day in the world.  We play blanket man, boy in a box, basketball, and other games which are created in an instant!

I am grateful for the great people who I work with at Harding School of Theology such as Dr. Allen Black (Dean), Jeannie Alexander (Administrative Assistant) and an outstanding faculty and staff.  I could go on and on about our students.  What a wonderful place to be!

I am grateful for wonderful churches where I’ve preached and taught this year.  Highland Church of Christ (Memphis) where I teach Bible classes regularly.  Millington Church of Christ (Millington, Tn.) where I preach once a month, as well as churches in a number states.  I am also blessed by the weekends I have spent with groups of elders/ministers in various congregations.

I am grateful for the opportunities to encourage and the opportunities to be encouraged.  I think of unexpected but encouraging calls, texts, e-mails, notes that I have received.  I am also grateful that the Lord has used me to send texts, e-mails, and notes to those who really needed to hear a kind and encouraging word.

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earlier-faster-better-precocious-kids-Nov06-istockI admit it.

At times throughout my life, I was confused – very confused. Maybe you weren’t. I do know people who appear to have had it together all of their lives. Not me.

When I was in college, I stayed up all night writing page after page of areas of life where I was confused. I still have these writings – I think – somewhere.

Yet, I have learned so much about life. I am still learning. However, I can point to growth in things I have learned.  I wish I had known these five much earlier.

1. I wish I had known the value of being gracious. Gracious people have a way of extending grace in their different relationships. People who are not gracious can be curt, rude, self-centered, and even self-absorbed. The gracious person has an extended hand – always willing to be helpful. The ungracious person looks out only for themselves. “Don’t ask me for help. That’s not my problem.”

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harding-school-of-theology (1)In December 2013, Charlotte and I moved to Memphis, Tennessee. I began working with Harding School of Theology, a wonderful seminary with some of the finest students anywhere.  We moved from our home of 20 years in Waco, Texas.  This was quite a transition.  For 36 years, I preached in primarily three different congregations in Texas, Missouri and Alabama.  I love serving a congregation.  It was a very difficult decision to move my ministry from a congregation to a seminary.

I serve as an administrator for this seminary.  Yet, I have never stopped preaching.  I continue to preach many Sundays and teach Bible classes either Sunday morning or Wednesday evenings.  The transition was not about ending ministry but changing its form and place.  Yet, it was a transition and transitions are not easy.

In three years I have learned much.

  1. I have learned the beauty of an unexpected phone call or note from someone whom I have known many years.  People from our congregation in Texas have been so good to us!
  2. I have learned how wonderful people are in Memphis.  So many people have been gracious.  I can’t count the  number of lunches and coffees that I’ve had with various people.
  3. I have learned the importance of silence.  Ruth Haley Barton has said, “… I believe silence is the most  challenging, the most needed and the least experienced spiritual discipline among evangelical Christians today.” (See Invitation to Solitude and Silence, Ruth Haley Barton, p. 19)
  4.  I have learned how precious it is when people give financially to help these students.  Specifically, when people  give to help provide scholarships, they really bless these students.  As a result, the congregations and cities where  these students will serve will be blessed.
  5. I have learned (again) the importance of maintaining a rhythm of life that renews.  Like many of you, I have no  trouble finding something to do.  Consequently, it is very important that I build into my life practices that can  renew me.  A time for exercise.  A time to think.  A time to read and reflect.  A time to rest.
  6. I have learned that transition is difficult, even if it is a good transition.  Transition takes a lot of energy.  Sometimes transition is imposed upon you.  At other times, it is something you choose.  Regardless, it is difficult.
  7.  I have learned much about developing habits that give a person endurance and energy.  This is been a very  important theme for me in the last few years.
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National_Thank_You_DayDoes a “Thank You” really matter?

Yes.  It really does!

Many of us perceive ourselves to be grateful people.  Often it is because we feel grateful.  We think about how thankful we are to others.  We may hear someone’s name and immediately feel very warm and thankful for them.  Yet, many, many people rarely, if ever express their gratitude.  Far too many people rarely say “thank you.”

You ask your sister to pick up a sandwich for you on her way home from work.  (She has called asking if you would like anything at fast food place where she is stopping.)  She gets home, hands you your sandwich and the first thing you say is, “I told you I didn’t want onions on this sandwich!  And where is the mustard!”  Not exactly a “thank you.”

So often, it is those closest to us who rarely, if ever, hear a “thank you.”

For example:

A young father asks his parents to keep your children for the evening while you and your wife go out to eat.  During the evening, your little girl falls off her bike and skins her knee.  Your parents explain what happened when you return to pick up the kids.  He responds by saying, “I told you that you have to watch her closely!”  Yet, they have set aside an entire evening to care for these children.  Not exactly a “thank you.”

A friend buys a gift for your child’s birthday.  She sends it in the mail.  Its not exactly the gift you would have chosen.  You never mention the gift to your friend.  If someone had mentioned this to you, you might have said, “Of course I appreciate her sending the gift.”  Yet, this is not exactly a “thank you.”

  • Maybe some may not express their thankfulness because they feel entitled to receive whatever people will give them.
  • Maybe some assume that others know they are thankful.
  • Perhaps some of us think we are expressing our gratitude much more than we really are.
  • Finally, some may say “thank you” but then behave in ways that really don’t reflect any kind of graciousness.

At this point, you might think, “Wait a minute, I tell people ‘thank you.z’  I express my gratitude for whatever someone does for me.  Many of us do express our gratitude to customers, co-workers, and the people we interact with everyday.  Yet, some of us take for granted our family and our closest friends.

The following questions might be worth some reflection as they pertain to friends and family:

  • Do others see me as a thankful person?
  • Is there someone in my life who feels taken for granted by me?
  • Are there people in my life who are long overdue for a word of gratitude?
  • Is there someone who has done a favor, sent a gift, or who has shown kindness who still has never received a heartfelt thank you from me?

Of course, one can simply dismiss this as irrelevant.  It could be, however, that regular expressions of thankfulness, as well as simply being thoughtful to friends and family could do wonders for these relationships.

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ThanksgivingTurkeyThis is Thanksgiving week and I am grateful to God. Like you, I can make quite a list of what I am thankful for.  I will give you some of the reasons why I am grateful. Perhaps in the comments you will be willing to share what you are thankful for.

*I am grateful to God, that through Jesus, I can have relationship with him.  As a result, I am also privileged to have relationship with many, many people in his church.

*I am grateful to Charlotte, for decades of marriage, for being a partner with me through each chapter of our adult lives. Together we have lived in Florence, Ala.; Pulaski, Tn.; Dallas, Tx.; Abilene Tx.; Florence, Ala. (again); Kansas City, Mo.; Waco, Tx.; and Memphis, Tn.

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Waco,_TX,_welcome_sign_IMG_0664Sunday morning, 150-200 bikers gathered at a local restaurant.  They are members of five different gangs.  They are wearing their colors.  A short time later, there is violence.

9 bikers dead.  18 in the hospital.  Motorcycle gangs.  Guns.  A shoot-out with police.  Blood.  Death.

This takes place on a Sunday morning in one of the nicest shopping areas in Central Texas.  Wow. I would have thought something like this would have happened at a seedy bar late one Saturday night.

In December 2013, we moved from Waco, Texas to Memphis, Tennessee, after having lived in that city for twenty years. The news is filled with details of these gangs and the shootings last Sunday.  No doubt people will be talking about this tragedy in Waco for many years.

Having lived in Waco for twenty years, I can tell you that there is another important story about this city.  This city has much that is good and is actually a wonderful place to live, raise children, and serve God.

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deleteHe snarled and complained about his job.  A friend of his, who worked for another company, had recently received a promotion.  “Some people get all the breaks!” He went on to talk about his friend who didn’t have to work near as hard as he did.  There was no sense of joy for his friend.  Nor did this man seem to take responsibility for anything related to his own career. Rather, he complained about how everyone else seems to get all the breaks.

I have learned there are some things in life that are best forgotten.  Now I haven’t always practiced this.  I can think of years in which I was stuck in unproductive thinking.  I allowed too much futile thinking to take up space and time.  Yet, how I think and what I focus on really do impact my life.

I want to suggest that some things need to be forgotten.

Forget what might have been.

Some people spend much of their energy focused on what might have been.  For them, life would have been great “if only.”  They are stuck in the past.

“If only my wife (or husband) was different.”

“If only I had taken a different job.”

“If only I had been treated fairly in my career.”

“If only I had gotten the breaks my brother-in-law received.”

Forget the entitlement.

Some people go through life believing they are entitled to a certain life.  This may be the young couple who believe they are entitled to a certain lifestyle (that may have taken their parents 35 years to afford.)  Others believe they are entitled to happiness and seem willing to break whatever commitments they’ve already made in order to experience this.  Years ago, a woman used this very expression in a conversation with me.  “I’m entitled to be happy” she said.  Two weeks later she left her husband and children.  People who are focused on their own sense of entitlement will break commitments and abandon relationships if they seem to stand in the way.

Forget the focus on someday.  

Some people are preoccupied with “someday.”  They speak as if life begins in the future.  Someday they plan to save money, get their finances in order, and live within their means.  Many people speak of changing their lives someday and quitting bad habits someday.  Yet life is experienced today not someday.

Each one of these approaches to life is a dead end street.  No progress is made when I am focused on any of these.  Life is happening today, not yesterday or someday.  I am entitled to nothing. Whatever good thing I experience in this life is a gift of God to be received with gratitude.

Question

What else needs to be forgotten?

 

 

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thankful (1)I am very thankful. (Each Thursday I write a post with church leaders in mind. However, today I want to focus on what I am grateful for. Perhaps this will simulate your thinking and even your gratitude as you consider your own life.)

I am grateful for my family.

  • I am grateful for Charlotte who dared to move to Memphis at this point in our lives to begin a fresh new chapter in our ministry. I am blessed.
  • I am grateful for Christine, mother of two wonderful little boys. I can’t imagine a more attentive mother. So thankful for Phillip, a good and devoted husband and father.
  • I am grateful for Jamie, the social worker with such a heart. Thankful for the way she is thoughtful to so many. So thankful for Cal, an unassuming, gracious husband and man.
  • For those whom I’ve known for so many years. So grateful to receive those texts, e-mails, and handwritten notes. I take none of this for granted.
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respect-dotRespect.

I suppose it may not a word that immediately gets your attention.  Perhaps it doesn’t have much buzz or flair.

Yet the importance of showing another respect is huge.

I’ve been thinking about it a lot lately.

  • A young husband is condescending to his wife, making her feel as if she is less intelligent than he is.
  • A teenager has a confrontation with his dad.  He tells his dad to “shut up” and walks away.  Thirty minutes earlier the boy was in a Wednesday evening Bible class.
  • A young woman is disrespectful to her mother-in-law, speaking to her in way that is demeaning and hurtful.
  • A man disrespects his wife, flirting with women at the office.  One woman at the office remarks, “You mean he’s married?”
  • A minister degrades the elders to others in the congregation and then kisses up to them in an elders meeting.  Disrespect.
  • An older man in the church abruptly approaches a young minister and says something insulting and crude in front of a visitor.

I am not suggesting that people needed to be “nicer.”

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